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Quote of the Week:

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“The great mistake is to anticipate the outcome of the engagement; you ought not to be thinking of whether it ends in victory or defeat. Let nature take its course, and your tools will strike at the right moment.” -Bruce Lee

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On Hip Hinges

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Pushing your hips and glutes backward before you squat, lunge, or perform a deadlift is very important for your low back and knee health. Practice hip hinges to ensure correct form before you perform any of the above exercises. Learn how to perform one here.

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A Note on Planks

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Planks are great, but extended isometric exercises don’t burn as many calories as exercises that require movement. Planks are great exercises to test your whole-body stability. After you’re able to hold a plank properly, try this exercise (below):

After you’ve mastered that, try adding movement to your planks. Plank-jacks and torso rotations (while in plank) offer stability challenges–and get you to move a little!

As always, be sure to check with your doctor before beginning any exercise routine.

Happy planking!

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On the Importance of Active Recovery

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There are a few ways to perform “active recovery” after a workout. Many of us do not recognize how important recovery is in exercise. One way to recover is by swimming or cycling the day after an intense workout session (this is “active” recovery)–the activity should be low-impact. Some “non-active” recovery methods include using a hot and / or cold compress and myofascial release (using a foam roller). There are many other recovery methods as well. You can choose to recover the day after a tough session, during a session, or a few hours after your session. See which method works for you, and stick with it. Proper nutrition is also an important component of recovery. Since exercise builds acid in your body (temporarily), choose alkaline-forming foods to help restore your body’s pH balance. Also, don’t forget the most important recovery method–sleep!

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Use RPE to Measure Intensity

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RPE, or ratings of perceived exertion, is a good way to measure intensity while you exercise. If used properly, it can be a better marker than HR (heart rate), because heart rate formulas do not take individualized responses to physical exertion into account. Learn more about RPE here or here.